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KittenClaw22
Member
4924 posts4924 posts
# Posted: 20 Mar 2006 08:11


Well, for the last month or two my cats have been bringing me mice as gifts, quite dead mice.

I pretty much only have one room in the whole house that the cats don't have access to. Today I went in there and seen a little mouse run across the room.

I went and got a cricket keeper and caught her. I sat in a quandry for severel minutes trying to deside what to do... Then I set up a 10 gallon with all the rodent luxeries I could lay my hands on.

She is ... very jumpy. To say the least, I am concerned that she is not going to adjust to captivity very well.

Has anyone tried to keep a wild mouse before?

Am I making a mistake?

If I just let her free in the yard a cat will get her, or she will just come back in the house.

She's really cute, and grey, and cuddley, and I am calling her Henrietta.


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nuggular
Member
2847 posts
2847 posts

# Posted: 20 Mar 2006 15:20


Bad idea. Wildmice can carry alot of diseases and it is in your best interest to get rid of it. Who knows what that mouse is carrying. It could have rabies for all you know. I would just let it go far away from your house.


Climb on!
TimOsborne
Member
2256 posts
2256 posts

# Posted: 20 Mar 2006 15:51


Find a field and let it go.. It has been free its whole life.. it will not do well in a cage now.. Let mother nature look out for her..

KittenClaw22
Member
4924 posts4924 posts
# Posted: 20 Mar 2006 18:02


She has all the signs of a healthy rodent, or I wouldn't have thought of it.

Clear, shiny eyes. Dry nose. Very active, if jumpy.

Why is everyone's first reaction, IT MIGHT HAVE RABIES. Small animals with rabies usually die within 10 days, this mouse has been living in my house for at least a month, maybe two. At the very most, a very large animal would show signs after 20-60 days, and die soon after showing signs.

She shows no signs, is a very small animal and would therefore show them quickly, and has been in my house for at least the incubation period... I think she's safe from rabies, unless I give them to her. WINK.

Diseased creatures generally die rather quickly in the rodent world. And if it were diseased, it would show the signs. Besides, if it were, my rodents would already have the same disease, if they are airborne. And they would have to be airborne to affect my rodents.

If she doesn't calm down in a day or two I will let her go.

But I live in the middle of a city, no fields around.


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Frogbert
Moderator
2424 posts
2424 posts

# Posted: 20 Mar 2006 18:44 · Edited by: Frogbert


Kitten,

My momma always said "if you don't want people opinions , then you shouldn't ask." You had to expect someone was going to have a different take on this than you! You have been here a long time so I am sure you know that!

I say do what ever you like, its your mouse living in your house eating your food and needing your care. The choice is all yours! IMO, it is risky because she may end up dying from stress. But she will dye in the wild at some point too! by Predator or by time.

I would look closely for mites and such cause they are transferable to your other furry creatures. (you can treat her if she is infected)
Otherwise as long as she is in her own enclosure, you should be fine to keep her if she adjusts to captivity. Most wild mice will not adjust and the stress will make them die slowly. GOOD LUCK!


"Lead a life of purpose, Kindness being the first." ME

"The life of the individual has meaning only in so far as it aids in the making the life of every living thing nobeler and more beautiful" Albert Einstein
squishyfrog
Member
46 posts
46 posts

# Posted: 20 Mar 2006 18:51


I highly recommend having a good, constant, source of water. I caught a mouse and decided to keep it when I was a kid and it died in less than a day because it didn't have any water. I say if it's healthy (and kept separate from other animals) keep it - it'll probably have a much happier life with all the food and water and protection it can get!


We think too small, like the frog at the bottom of the well. He thinks the sky is only as big as the top of the well. If he surfaced, he would have an entirely different view.
Mao Tse-Tung
KittenClaw22
Member
4924 posts4924 posts
# Posted: 20 Mar 2006 19:09 · Edited by: KittenClaw22


I gave her a water bottle but I am concerned she wouldn't know what to do with one.

I think I am going to wait for a couple days and release her at a park.

And as for different opinions... People shouldn't express them if they don't want a counter opinion. There will always be someone to disagree with you, that's a fact of life.


[img]http://www.danasoft.com/sig/kittenclaw22.jpg[/img]
Heather
Moderator
7561 posts
7561 posts

# Posted: 20 Mar 2006 22:39 · Edited by: Heather


As already mentioned, wild mice don't tend to adjust to captivity. I too, tried to keep one that I found in my house a few years back. Seemed healthy and all... but after speaking with a vet friend of mine I opted to release it in a field a couple miles away.

The vet reminded me that even if kept in a separate enclosure and away from my cats, some parasites will venture out of that encloser and possibly infect other critters in the house. Plus the stress alone of suddenly being trapped in a small cage could, in itself, kill it.

The parasite, mite and flea factor alone makes me vote to release it. And the fact that it may appear healthy but could very well be harboring some sort of illness makes me nervous. Especially if you try to handle it at some point and it bites you. Rabbies aren't my concern... an infection caused by a wild animal bite, however, does.


* Heather *

1.1.0 Dendrobate Azureus
justfroggie
Member
427 posts
427 posts

# Posted: 20 Mar 2006 22:57


I personally wouldn't keep it! BUT thats me and my opinon for the simple facts that everyone else has already mentioned... good luck!


Rhonda Lynn :)
KittenClaw22
Member
4924 posts4924 posts
# Posted: 20 Mar 2006 23:27


We are going to release it, all she does is huddle under a little cardboard box I put in there for her. She seems to have made a bed some time last night, carried some of the food and tissue paper strips under the box and stays there.

I can't imagine how hard it probably is on her. She was running for her life stealing cat food from the bowl to live, and now she is in a glass box that cats sit on all the time.

Probably pretty traumatic.

She is just so sweet looking though. Little twitchy nose, little shiny black eyes.

my hubby did say though, "Christ, if you want a mouse, buy a domesticated one from the petstore, they are just $1!"

But it isn't about wanting a mouse... I think its just that she was so pitiful in that little plastic box, scuttling about, scared. I have this complex, I just want to help anything in distress, and I can't help it.

Wild rodents lives tend to be less than 3 months long, but in captivity they can live for years!

And besides the first "domestic" mouse must have been wild...

I doubt fleas or mites would be an issue though, or my cats would already have them.

I think I am going to have to break down and let my husband put out traps. Or maybe just open up that room and let the cats have reign.

When my neighbors moved out, their mice moved into my house, and it was at least 5 weeks ago that it started. I think they are filtering over slowly. I don't know why they would move in here though, I have 5 cats!


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