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x5dmr
Member
71 posts
71 posts

# Posted: 16 Feb 2004 22:11


So i have a take home midterm for my forest managment class. i answered one question, and i have a lot mroe to do, btu all i can seem to do is anything but my work. play guitar, go online, play with my IPOD (which is one of the greatest inventions in the world) and other useless stuff. i need to be locked in a room with just my work and that's it. i just felt that i needed to share that. because i needed to do something that felt productive.

oh, side note.
in ohio here it is supposed to be like 50 this weekend and raining. so my friend and i are gonna go see if we can find some salamaders on their mass march to the ponds (that is if the ground and ponds of thawed enough). jsut to observe. it sounds early for breeding but it really ins't.

spydergirl4594
Member
1607 posts
1607 posts

# Posted: 17 Feb 2004 00:14


well get your butt off this forum until you finish! that sounds like such a cool course to take,so take the test and pass so you can have a cool job! cant we ban him until he's finished? and dont you go huinting for sallies until your done! but good luck!


-Sheryl
Brian
Member
2274 posts
2274 posts

# Posted: 17 Feb 2004 05:12


Which salamanders?

x5dmr
Member
71 posts
71 posts

# Posted: 17 Feb 2004 18:55


I think Ambystoma texanum (small mouth, Ambystoma jeffersonianum (jefferson salamander), and Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum (tiger salamander), maybe some ambystoma macultum but it is still to early in the seasnon for them.

Brian
Member
2274 posts
2274 posts

# Posted: 18 Feb 2004 05:58


Oh cool. I'm going to try to see some new species migrating like Ambystoma californiense and A. gracile this year if possible. Plus the Taricha migration is always cool.

Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 19 Feb 2004 02:40


I wish I was int he kind of area where I could see amphibian migrations, the river here is so polluted that I've never even seen a turtle in it, in fact I've never seen any other animal in it besides fish.


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x5dmr
Member
71 posts
71 posts

# Posted: 19 Feb 2004 15:35


well most of the ambystomas breed in ponds (ususally with not many fish in them) you might want to try some local state parks, and there may be some small vernal pools in there. heck the one place i found some spotted salamanders and some eastern newt larvea, is in a patch of woods about 4 or 5 acres and is pretty much surrounded by large parking lots, excpet for maybe a field on one side. so you just never know.

Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 19 Feb 2004 18:48


Oh, we don't have many ponds close to here, and the state park we have is BarkCapm State Park, which doesn't have much either, just a huge lake, and there's only a couple spots where salamanders go there. There used to be a nice stream where I saw tiger salamander larvae there about 12 years ago, but peopel screwed it up with their horses over there, then let it overgrow, so it all filled in.


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cheshireycat
Member
3789 posts
3789 posts

# Posted: 20 Feb 2004 07:54 · Edited by: cheshireycat


Don't even complain, Josh, there is only a single newt species where I live and that's it. No other salamanders, and I haven't even seen the friggin newt, ever. Lots and lots of water, but no sals > (<-that's *supposed* to be a mad face, but it won't come out)

Edit:
Damn, I'm wrong... I'm looking at CalPhotos and it says there are Giant Palm Salamanders here. Still, nothing I've found.

What kinds of sals do you all find? I know some places in the West and North East have a ton. I love them.


- Evolution is a theory, not just a fact. -
Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 20 Feb 2004 16:38


All I can find at barkcamp are slimy slamanders, dusky salamanders and once a spotted salamander. But you get lizards down there alex, there aren't any here.


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Brian
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2274 posts
2274 posts

# Posted: 20 Feb 2004 21:58 · Edited by: Brian


Chesireycat, you have the very rare "florida" Eastern newt don't you? I heard you can only find it at around 7 locations.

Here we have the 3 species of Taricha (newts), Dicamptodon (up to 15 inch brown tiger salamander like thing that can actually climb and "bark", Ensatina, Slender salamanders, and Aneides (climbers with big heads for the local species). Ambystoma californiense is very rare, but farther north Ambystoma gracile looks cool as it have toad like glands behind the head.

Newts are the most common though as they can be seen walking around in the daytime.

bonsai
Member
1925 posts
1925 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 01:07


cheshirecat,
Yes, the North East does have loads of newts! I even have 1 or 2 that live in my basement. No tank, they love to come in and hang around the plants on the floor (under the florescence lighting). They are my insect control team.


*snarky remarky at your service*...http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=snarky
cheshireycat
Member
3789 posts
3789 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 17:09


Arrgh, I want some newties!

Brian, very few newts find their home this far south in the United States. Florida has plenty of them, they're just mostly in the panhandle. Do you know where that newt has been found? Daytona, when I lived there, supposedly had some sal and newt species (more than we do), but I cant really find much.

Josh, there are no lizard types up there? None?


- Evolution is a theory, not just a fact. -
Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 18:14


Alex, there's no lizards species around here, there are supposed to be but living here almost my entire life I have never seen a lizard here. And very few herps actually are around here. We get 3 species of turtles around here, Painted Turtles, Snapping Turtles, and Softshelled Turtles, we have a few species of frogs locally, but you never see them unless you go way out in the middle of nowhere.


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cheshireycat
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3789 posts

# Posted: 22 Feb 2004 04:15 · Edited by: cheshireycat


I don't usually find any native frogs around here, either, I have to get out of this whole area. Around the suburbs it's just cane toads, Cuban treefrogs, and greenhouse frogs. If you're very, very lucky, a lake may have a Rana here or there. The city itself probably has nothing more than the marine toads.


- Evolution is a theory, not just a fact. -
x5dmr
Member
71 posts
71 posts

# Posted: 26 Feb 2004 03:38


well, i got my Forest Managment midterm back (the one i was trying to do when i started this thread) I got a 92 on it. we are getting into the economics of it all now. not to fun, but some what interesting. like figuring out the net present value of harvesting som trees in say 30 years. like would it be worth it to do a thinning now (thinning: remove some trees to let others grow better)and then do a final harvest at age 30, or would it be more economical to not thin and just harvest in 30 years.
need to tink about inflation and the value of the dollar in the future (which is inflation i guess) and timber prices in the future.
it sounds dry and boring, but very practical.

Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 26 Feb 2004 03:40


Very dry and boring, I say answer C.Leave the trees and nver cut them down. The most economical and best thing for the area in question.


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x5dmr
Member
71 posts
71 posts

# Posted: 26 Feb 2004 11:37 · Edited by: x5dmr


well unless you don't like living in a house, or writing on paper, or reading books, or using a desk, or a dresser, or many other everyday things, then some trees do need cut.
And sometimes areas do need cut in order to keep the area maintained in a certain state. such as white oak stand that has red maple shooting up in. you see before we really startedto mess with nature, fire would ahve went through and wiped out the red maple, but now we need to go in a do a thinning or selective harvest to simulate a fire.
many of the forestry pracitces that are conducted by foresters (certified and stuff like that) are designed to simulate natural occurances. so it can actually make a forest ecosystem healthy if done the right way and best managment practices are used.

But i do agree, in some cases doing nothing is the best thing to do, but in the end it is all up to the land owner, all the forester can do is give them all the different options that they have, and in doing so trying to keep out their own personal opinions from persuading the land owner.

Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 26 Feb 2004 18:22


My point is, we're the worst thing ecologically to happen to this planet so far, we hack everything down, eat everything up, blow everything up, and poison everything we don't care about, which is pretty much everything. Hopefully though there will be something left after humans are gone from this planet.


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x5dmr
Member
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71 posts

# Posted: 26 Feb 2004 18:30


I agree with you there for sure. we (as a whole) are terrible on this planet. but things are on a rebound in areas. like ohio that was logged down to like 10% forest land and now it is up to around 34 or 35% and there are even reports of blackbear in northeast ohio.
but yeah we are doing horrible things to this planet, anf it is a daunting task to try to get people to change their ways to be more environmentally friendly. like cigarette butts, man i need a sign to keep in my car that says "cigarette butts are litter too" (saw a road sign like that somewhere)so when i see someone toss that out the window i can show them the sign.

Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 26 Feb 2004 18:54


I'm sure you've heard the stories about the Ohio River if you know about the small amout of forests here. It shouldn't even be a river, it was 2 feet deep when people moved into this area, and now we dammed it up and it floods now, so now everyone complains when it floods, it would have never gotten that high before the water level was raised up. Then we had companies dumping their waste into it, which included anythigng and everything from dead bodies to toxic waste, they still find bodies in the river as a regular occurence.
But the only way we're gonna get all this to stop is if there's no people anymore, which is kinda sad to say. People as a group are only concerned with themselves and with how much money they can make, which means that nothing is safe as long as there are people. Wasn't it Japan that claimed owner ship of the moon once?


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