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talk to the frog / Other herps and invertebrates / Small Tutles/Tortoise's
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Moe


# Posted: 16 Sep 2003 02:40


...since we were talking about turtles before, what would be a small size (Aquatic, or Terrestrial) to buy for my cousin? She wants something that doesnt get huge, and fairly easy to keep.

I heard that its illegal for them to be sold under 4", but ive seen them sold here at 2", so....im not sure if its safe to get one..?

Are red-foots a good beginner? What about sliders?
Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 16 Sep 2003 03:36


Go with Painted Turtles, they are by far the easiest semi-aquartic turtles to keep. I have been keeping turtles for many years now, and rarely have I ever had a painted turtle die on me. Oh I've owned about 300 painted turtles, most were only kept for a few weeks at a time. But I have had about 70 long term captive painted turtles. I have also kept sliders, cooters, softshells, musks, muds, box turtles and some various others. But painteds are by far the eaisest, and some only get to be about 6" in length at adult hood with normal maximums at 8-10".


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Derek Benson
Member
3608 posts
3608 posts

# Posted: 16 Sep 2003 03:41


I'd go with russian tortoise. I have a male that's pretty cool. I like aquatic turtles fine, but only problem is you need good filtration and they smell terrible.


Derek Benson - Phyllomedusa/Hyperolius Enthusiast
n74gordon
Member
295 posts
295 posts

# Posted: 16 Sep 2003 03:58


hi moe-

-i've thought of picking up a turtle and always wanted to begin with a very small one.

-the reason that i found that the carapice needs to be a minimum length is due to many cases in the 70s where small turtles were sold in large numbers and young children were getting salmonella poisoning from handling the turtles without washing their hands afterwards.

-i have also found that smaller turtles are available ... for educational purposes. for this reason, i have decided that if/when i decide to pick up a small turtle, i will tell a little grey one and say that i am a grade school teacher. *wink, wink!*

nate
http://pubpages.unh.edu/~ngordon


... trying to help
dubumb
Member
37 posts
37 posts

# Posted: 16 Sep 2003 04:49


Red foots would not fit your description... Red and yellow foots get about 20" in length which is pretty big. If you want a smaller tortoise, i would go with either the Greek, Golden greek, Russian, or Hermanns tortoise. These will all remain under 12". Try very hard to get captive bred animals, they will be the healthiest. Also, if you have no choice but to get a wild caught animal, make sure to bring it straight to the vet since most WC tortoises are LOADED with worms.

Another alternative to the above species would be the Egyptian Tortoise... These are wonderful tortoises that stay about 4".. The only catch is, they are VERY VERY hard to find, and when you finally find them they will cost you about $300-$400...

All of the species i mentioned before should be under $150...

hope i helped.


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spydergirl4594
Member
1607 posts
1607 posts

# Posted: 16 Sep 2003 04:55 · Edited by: spydergirl4594


there are also hingeback tortoises which dont get too big ah well i believe. we have one in work priced at about $109. i love the little red ear slider babies, and would have alot of them if they didnt get so big. there are always ways to find them under 4 inches.

Box turtles are good turtles too, but for some reaosn I have always had the problem with the pussy eyes on them.


-Sheryl
dubumb
Member
37 posts
37 posts

# Posted: 16 Sep 2003 16:51


is they had runny eyes, it could be a humidity problem


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Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 16 Sep 2003 17:25


Actually Derek I've only had a problem with smell from aqutic turtles when I either had the tank over crowded, overfed the turtles, or had no filtration on the tank. A painted turtles should be fine in a 30 gallon tank with the appropriate pump/filter until after it gets about 4" in length, after that move it to a 60 gallon tank which will be big enough unless it exceeds 8" which could take about 6 or 7 years. I generally stack rocks in the tank for a haulout area and basking area, and use a whisper pump(for a 30 I would go with one that pumps for a 60 and you will rarely need to clean the tank), and have a gravel substrate(whatever color floats your boat) and have some feeeder goldfish in the tank at all times and feed the turtles commercial turtles food(it already has vitamins and suppliments in it), but you will need full spectrum lighting for whatever kind of turtle you go for which is pretty expensive(otherwise they develope weak shells, shell rot, and get sick). I hope this helps some more.


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Moe


# Posted: 16 Sep 2003 21:39


..ok, redfoots are out of the list. What about spotted turtles? ...they only get to 5", and are semiquatic. Are they common in the pet trade?
Moe


# Posted: 17 Sep 2003 00:05


Derek: How much was your russian tortoise? What size enclosure do you keep it in? And are they hard to keep?
Derek Benson
Member
3608 posts
3608 posts

# Posted: 17 Sep 2003 00:38


My russian was overpriced at $60. I keep it in a 4'x2' plywood pen. Easy to keep.


Derek Benson - Phyllomedusa/Hyperolius Enthusiast
Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 17 Sep 2003 03:29


A spotted turtle runs about $100.00, and in some states you need permits to keep them. Same for wood turtles.
And I do have a russian tortoise as well, and fine painted turtles more active and more fun to watch on top of easier to feed, my russin tortoise can go though 1/4 pound of veggies a day and still want more. YOu can feed a painted turtle at hatchling size 4 or 5 sticks of food twice a day and it'll usually be too much, at adult about 30 -40 sticks twice a day.
Remember though, whatever you get the turtle will be the cheapest thing to buy, the set up will be the thing to cost you. And keep space constraints in mind as well.


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dubumb
Member
37 posts
37 posts

# Posted: 17 Sep 2003 06:00


Derek: How much was your russian tortoise? What size enclosure do you keep it in? And are they hard to keep?

Very easy to keep... http://russiantortoise.org/ That page has all of the info you need about them


http://members.lycos.co.uk/herpforum/ <----My new Herp Forum, Please visit!!!
Moe


# Posted: 19 Sep 2003 02:46


Well, shes decided on a painted (so have I...i'll probably be getting one aswell =)

anyway, i have a spare 20g high, driftwood, a flourescent fixture, and sand substrate, but i'll be getting a heater (is it necessary?) and a filter soon.

So, my question is, do i need to cycle the aquarium first, like you do for fish? If so, can i use bio-spira?

How long would it take for a baby outgrow a 20?

Can you give a list for the food you offer to yours? Can i feed crickets? Fruit flies? worms?

-thanks for the help...
Moe


# Posted: 19 Sep 2003 02:50


o yea, i have a incandeascent fixture aswell, but what wattage would i need for a basking spot?

ad if i have a basking spot, would i need a submersible heater?
Josh
Member
3432 posts3432 posts
# Posted: 19 Sep 2003 04:06


Well, Painteds are active most of the year, they're the first aquatic turtles out of hibernation. The basking spot should be at least 90 degrees but not over 100. It can take years for them to outgrow a 20 gallon tank, depending on what size you get them at. You won't need to cycle the aquarium first, but it you don't use declorinated water let it sit for a couple days for the initial filling of the tank. No water heating is necessary since the waters they live in are generally cool, so room temperature should suffice. You can feed turtles just about anything, but I would use the floating turtles sticks as the main diet, any plants or other animals you put in with them are food to them, so no plastic plants. And I prefer gravel as a substrate for turtles, just use pea sized gravel so if they ingest some it passes through their system normally. I have fed my turtles crickets mealworms, goldfish, crayfish, spiders, flies, tadpoles, frogs, beetles, earthworms, just make sure not to feed them anything poisonous like fire flies. Painted Turtles are not picky eaters, so if they refuse to eat something and will only eat something else hold out on it and make it eat what you offer it. They often refuse all but the shrimp dlight food, which should not be fed as a majopr part of their diet since it is not high in the vitamins they need. If you have any other questions just ask.


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x5dmr
Member
71 posts
71 posts

# Posted: 23 Sep 2003 00:47


i would go with an eastern box or a three toed box turtle, they don't get very big and the enclosure set is can be very simple and they are pretty hardy. as for aquatic species painted turtles are the hardiest, but red eared sliders are great too. but both species can get up to 9 inches.

Derek Benson
Member
3608 posts
3608 posts

# Posted: 23 Sep 2003 03:06


I saw a spotted turtle for $150 and the kansas city expo.


Derek Benson - Phyllomedusa/Hyperolius Enthusiast
Anonymous


# Posted: 4 Dec 2003 18:14


howlong do turtles live
aff15
Member
316 posts
316 posts

# Posted: 4 Dec 2003 18:42


some can out live me or you!


Zach-Probably the saddest thing youll ever see is a mosquito sucking on a mummy.Forget it,little guy
Devin Edmonds
Member
613 posts
613 posts

# Posted: 4 Dec 2003 19:30


Most aquatic basking turtles will live 25-40 years in captivity. Some will live longer. Eastern box turtles have been recorded for living for over 80 years in captivity. Its not uncommon for large species of tortoises to live for 100 years.

Devin
www.amphibiancare.com

yellowboy
Member
438 posts
438 posts

# Posted: 4 Dec 2003 21:31


the thing with the over 4" carapace ...it is perfectly legal to sell hatchlings etc as long as the seller is not wholesale and sells fewer than a certain number a year. this is to accomodate pet owners who suddenly have eggs and stuff i bought a hatchling red ear a while back and he is very big now. The law is actually getting looked into again by the FDA or whatever the disease control place is that first petitioned for the law because of the salmonella...something like a waiver notice or a required age to buy the turtles was a possiblity...

Moe


# Posted: 4 Dec 2003 21:56


Hey,

As long as this topic is up again, i bought her a painted (and gave her the supplies). Doesnt look like ill be keeping one though, O well.

Thanks for all the help again.

M.N
spydergirl4594
Member
1607 posts
1607 posts

# Posted: 5 Dec 2003 04:28


i have a 3 inch sulcata tortoise hatchling at the moement,if i do ok raising him ill have to put him in my will.


-Sheryl
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