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cheshireycat
Member
3789 posts
3789 posts

# Posted: 20 Feb 2004 07:48 · Edited by: cheshireycat


Hey, does anyone have any good book recommendations that a person like me who has little else to read at night could find at the local library? I'm too poor to buy anything right now, and, unfortunately, the local library stinks and doesn't seem to understand the notion of updating anything other than the childrens' books section.

But, if there are any common books any of you found interesting and would recommend, please list them!

I know it's a silly question, but I hate not having anything to read and not being able to buy something new. I like fiction (especially short stories) and case studies the most.

Thank you!


- Evolution is a theory, not just a fact. -
Charlie
Moderator
5432 posts
5432 posts

# Posted: 20 Feb 2004 08:00


Anne Rice, Clive Barker. Nuff said.


We can never go back to the way it was...
lostriver
Member
1737 posts
1737 posts

# Posted: 20 Feb 2004 16:25 · Edited by: lostriver


I like Carl Hiaasen's stories and Tony Hillerman for light reading. Hillerman's Finding Moon is especially good, and a change from his Navaho murder mysteries. Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress, (Dai Sijie), Like Water for Chocolate (Laura Esquirel), Walking Across Egypt (Clyde Edgerton), anything by Amy Tan, Mary Renault, Richard Russo, and Jincy Willett's short stories, Jenny and the Jaws of Life. I like Lawrence Block's "Burglar" series--Burgler in the Rye, etc., but not his other stuff. About every two or three years I re-read O'Henry's short stories. These were published at the turn of the century, so you may find them a bit "quaint." P.J. O'Rourke's essay collections are fun. For non-fiction you might enjoy Bones-A Forensic Detective's Casebook, by Ubelaker and Scammell. There's just so much stuff, it's hard to pick favorites.

I always screw up the underline, so didn't use it on the titles.


Lee
HellersAngel
Member
68 posts
68 posts

# Posted: 20 Feb 2004 18:30


A Tale of Two Cities is a good book. So is Gulliver's Travels. I know they're standard high school reading (well, for honors classes, anyway) but they were two of my favorites and should be stocked at any library.

spydergirl4594
Member
1607 posts
1607 posts

# Posted: 20 Feb 2004 19:32


i really like ouse of Leaves and Angelas Ashes. I like reading about depressing stories and weirdo psychology stuff.


-Sheryl
lostriver
Member
1737 posts
1737 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 03:01 · Edited by: lostriver


The antithesis to Angelas Ashes is a cheery Irish story: The Mammy. It's the same poverty, but a different attitude. We must have lent it out, since I can't find it here, nor remember the author. There were two sequels that didn't live up to the original. There is nothing wrong with the old classics or later, like Steinbeck, Sallinger, and Mark Twain wrote some things other than Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer, that are much better, like Letters to Earth and Innocents Abroad, and A Pen Warmed up In Hell. The first and last were published posthumously, because they would have been banned in his time and would probably offend Miss Marigold even today. We read so much, because we don't have a television. I kicked in the only one we ever owned when we were first married and made a liquor cabinet out of the cabinet it was set in, after enduring the commercials and inane sitcoms for a month. Neither Ariel nor I had a TV in the house when we grew up. We went to movies because these were dates and social events, and if the movie wasn't interesting, you could hold hands and smootch. Television is somehow different. I hate being blared at as if my brains were a bowl of tapioca.

We both live with books. Either of us can sleep when the other has turned the light on to read. Reading is an answer to insomnia. You can begin to read a story, then go to sleep imagining while you make up your own story, then dream about it.


Lee
spydergirl4594
Member
1607 posts
1607 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 03:36


Lee,it was written by Frank McCourt,the sequal was 'Tis same author,and the third im not sur eof the title but it was by his brother,Michael McCourt. I saw the movie for Angela's Ashes and it did the book no justice. I could not put it down,I had to see what else could possibly go wrong in the lives. I didnt like 'Tis so much because Frank started to feel sorry for hisself,and I dont like that. Frank McCourt was Angela's first son. I highly recoomend it.


-Sheryl
lostriver
Member
1737 posts
1737 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 05:03


Angela's Ashes was written by Frank McCourt, and I know that, and I have read it, but The Mammy, which I have finally found in our library chaos, was written by Brendan O'Carroll-- He did apparently act in the film version of Angela's
Ashes, as well. I don't know what part he played. I didn't see the movie, only read the novel. He is a stand-up commedian in Ireland. It's odd that his novel The Mammy is such a great book, with humour and strength, then the sequels suck, loose all the humor and kill everyone off and all the winners with character lose in a shower of pathos and sentimentality that would make a rattlesnake puke. The sequels, The Chiselers, and The Granny are not worth reading. They just take the rug out from under The Mammy. This is fiction. Angela's Ashes is an autobiography. I can appreciate Angela's Ashes, however devastating and powerfully negative it is, because it is not invention, but I can't tolerate what Brendan O'Carroll did in his sequals in fiction. He has written one perfectly delightful, humorous novel full of great people--all of them close and strong, all of them winners, even in poverty. Then he writes two more totally humourless sequels and destroys his creations.

It's like killing your own child.


Lee
mve
Member
1732 posts
1732 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 08:00


House of leaves,by
Mark Z. Danielewski
it is a trip.


http://www.myspace.com/somanyothers
cheshireycat
Member
3789 posts
3789 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 16:50


I've read only Tale of Two Cities and Gulliver's Travels and will, hopefully, head over to the library and see what I can find on all the other suggestions. I'll read in a bit while there and just pick my favorites to not bring home a thousand books

Thanks all of you!


- Evolution is a theory, not just a fact. -
HellersAngel
Member
68 posts
68 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 18:14


My old college roommate used to go to the library and read whatever books they had more than one of. Her idea was that if they had more than one copy, it must be popular and therefore good. Maybe that will help.

spydergirl4594
Member
1607 posts
1607 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 21:40


Yes,House Of Leaves seems to be the new trendy book amongst my peers now.

Thanks for the advice about The Mammy,Im definately going to look into that one. Now that i dont have school at nights anymore,only college applications to fill out,I have nothing better to do. might as well pick up a good book.


-Sheryl
Frogbert
Moderator
2424 posts
2424 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 22:29


Mary Queen of Scotland & the Isles
by Margret George

And my all time favorites..
Anne of Green Gables series
LM Montgomery
Original books- not the movie post release.


"Lead a life of purpose, Kindness being the first." ME

"The life of the individual has meaning only in so far as it aids in the making the life of every living thing nobeler and more beautiful" Albert Einstein
ginevive
Member
989 posts
989 posts

# Posted: 21 Feb 2004 22:55


Anne Rice. Also, anyone who likes her, please try poppy Z Brite. She is like a darker, better version of Rice in my opinion. I like reading anything about psychology, learning about the human brain, and stuff like that. I like fiction to a point, but I sorta prefer reading nonfiction, learning about history, and all that dorky stuff.


-JEN- :)
lostriver
Member
1737 posts
1737 posts

# Posted: 22 Feb 2004 02:07


I'll look for House of Leaves the next time we get off the ranch and go to the city where there is a Barnes and Noble. Even driving past Barnes and Noble tends to max out our budget. Can anyone tell me who wrote it?

Sorry, but I just keep thinking of more "must-reads." Cold Comfort Farm is a classic parody on the old genre of cheerful young girl comes to a depressed farm and turns things around. It's truly parody and humor at its best. Stella Gibbons, 1932.

I collect mystery classics such as Rex Stout (now back in print) especially his Nero Wolfe series Jeff Chandler, etc. I'm still looking for more Craig Rice (who was a woman) that I read as a kid because both my mother and grandmother were into her mysteries, but have found only a few of them. I think modern young people would find them very dated, as well as politically incorrect. The protangonists drank a lot of booze, had a straight shot of rye and a soda craker for breakfast, and skidded around in automobiles drunk. Craig Rice (her pseudonym) was an alcoholic herself. Her full name was Georgiana Ann Randolph Walker Craig Lipton DeMott Bishop. She was the first mystery writer to grace "Time," in 1946, as the only woman who wrote the distinctly American genre, apt to mix the pleasures of the wake and the moment in a combination of hard drink, hilarity and spoofs. "She wrote the binge, but lived the hangover." Her other pseudonyms were Michael Venning and Daphne Sanders, and she was the ghost writter for Gypsy Rose Lee and George Sanders. My favorite of her books was Home Sweet Homicide, which I have not been able to find.

Ahh, books!


Lee
cheshireycat
Member
3789 posts
3789 posts

# Posted: 22 Feb 2004 03:57


Frogbert, I was given a paperback bookset of L.M. Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables (and more to the series) a few years back, and it never really suited my fancy, so you're welcome to them if you have an interest for them. I almost donated them three or so years ago, but forgot to bring them and so they're here if you want them.

Personaly, I have rather odd and varied taste, which I'll let you all in on--whether or not you care

Catcher in the Rye is probably my favorite book because of the way it's written, although I've read more J.D. Salinger and didn't find it as good. In high school, I also really liked Grendel (John Garner), and that's probably about it. I'm really interested in neurology-related texts, and Oliver Sacks' I really like and am sure can find more of. Also, if anyone has heard of Melanie Rae Thon, she's probably my favorite author, although there are two books of hers I don't like at all. It's fiction, some are collections of short stories, and I guess it's very female-centered in most ways. I just love the characters.

I've already read some Anne Rice in the past and didn't find it to my liking, either, although Wes recommended certain titles that I will pick up and give another try.

But, thanks again and keep the titles coming!


- Evolution is a theory, not just a fact. -
Frogbert
Moderator
2424 posts
2424 posts

# Posted: 22 Feb 2004 04:47


I like LM Montgomery as a reminder of what has been lost. The simpleness of the time relaxes my soul.

It is not all I like, I was just throwing out some variety. Didn't know whether it would be to your liking or not. Seems it wasn't and no harm done.

Watership Down is an amazing classic. JRR Tolken, Upton Sinclair, and Issac Asimov are a few other classics. My husband is a Stephen King and Dean Koontz fan. I have nightmares at the thought of the boogie man. Or perhaps the Bible. Whether you are a believer or not it tells a great story. I have heard that the Koran is also a good read. My sister really like Amerika by Franz Kafka, for me it was something to read and it did make me think.

They are not about Neurology, yet for "a person like you who has little else to read at night could find at the local library", they may be worth a try.


"Lead a life of purpose, Kindness being the first." ME

"The life of the individual has meaning only in so far as it aids in the making the life of every living thing nobeler and more beautiful" Albert Einstein
mve
Member
1732 posts
1732 posts

# Posted: 22 Feb 2004 19:30


lostriver, read my post, I said the author for House of Leaves, ....Mark Z. Danielewski , and flip through it at the bookstore, the way it is written is very strange. Some pages only have 1 word on them, some are written with around a box that mirror's the page before it. It is just strange. Is anyone here Dutch? If so, there is a great book called the UnDutchables. I think this has many volumes, but it is comedy about the dutch lifestyle. very funny. If your Dutch at least.


http://www.myspace.com/somanyothers
x5dmr
Member
71 posts
71 posts

# Posted: 26 Feb 2004 01:32


Young Men and Fire by Norman Maclean (the guy who wrote a River Runs Through It)
Ishmael by Daniel Quinn (excellent book)
Anthem and Fountain Head by Any Rand
anything by Kurt Vonnegut
Catch 22 by Joseph Heller
The Zen and the Art to Motorcycle Repair (or somehtin like that) its a philosophical book written by a guy whose insane.
Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold (wildlife conservation and sustainable forestry are is based on a lot of his veiws and Gifford Pinchots as well)
The Mists of Avalon was really good
Into the Wild (John Krak????) Really good book
those are all really good books that you should be able to find in a library

cheshireycat
Member
3789 posts
3789 posts

# Posted: 26 Feb 2004 17:23


Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance? Okay--that's an easy one to start on since my bf has it (somewhere, somewhere).

I've read a lot of those books, X5DMR, so I can look for the rest at the library, although I'm not sure they'll hold all those titles. The library near me is quite small, although I'm sure others here could go out and buy the books so it's okay for them. It's just a regular public library by me, nothing even close to the main branch, and the only decent libraries around here are university libraries (restricted) and the main branch of our public library which is in downtown and I'm pretty far. Then again, I have another couple of branches I could visit of the public library that I think hold larger, newer, and better collections than the one nearest to me... still, not so far away.

Frogbert, I'll give all those classics a go since I'm almost certain that the library will carry them, or I can (even better) find someone who has the book. My dad has tons of books that I guess I should look through, but I want to start with what's good, and that's why I'm asking for recommendations. I did read the Bible, though, can't remember which version, and it's a good read to get riled up by. Almost the whole first testament gets me practically yelling at some of the stuff they say

And I totally dig what you mean when you say that Anne of Green Gables is relaxing in a reminiscent sort of way--it's hard for me to relate to it, but things like The Secret Garden made me feel similarly calm and at ease, tranquil, in a way that I can almost swear having memories of my own secret garden when it's obvious I don't. Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea puts me in a similar mood, just because it feels so close to me, even though I'm not an old man with those duties. Things like that are weird

I've been dealing thus far by going into a book that my boyfriend is required to have for his english class (not a textbook) with the century's supposed best literature (emphasis on "supposed), and finding a lot of good short stories. A lot aren't that great, though, and I just read the ones I like. It's kind of cool because I started reading a story I've seen a made-for-TV movie of before, a decade or so ago, and reading stories that I've never heard of by authors who have written things that I have read before. There was a story I particularly enjoyed, and I'll post up the title and author when I find it again. To be honest, I read 4 or 5 short stories back to back until I am so tired I can barely understand what I'm reading and then pass out. When I wake up, I remember reading the stories, but not the distinctions between them, and it's just one big jumble of characters and events, except for anything I read way before I fell asleep. So, I really have to re-read to find what I found good beforehand Silly, eh?


- Evolution is a theory, not just a fact. -
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