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talk to the frog / Breeding / North American green tree frog hibernation questio
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back2eight


# Posted: 29 Dec 2005 01:16


I am thinking of catching some green tree frogs this spring/summer when they come out. There are always lots of them on my windows in the evenings in warmer weather. My question is how do you breed them? Is it necessary for them to go into hibernation in the winter, and if so, how do you make hibernation happen? I can't see how to get the vivarium cool enough unless I put it outside for the winter. I need to know how hard it is going to be to raise them before I commit to it and get the vivarium set up. thanks!
TimOsborne
Member
2256 posts
2256 posts

# Posted: 29 Dec 2005 06:16


GTF's are very hardy.. and very easy to raise.
Unfortunately, You wont find much information on breeding them though.. They are cheaper to catch in the wild than breed and raise from the young.. so.. that is what most suppliers do. I honestly don't know of anyone that breeds them..

back2eight


# Posted: 29 Dec 2005 14:59


Ok, well, how do you put an animal into hibernation? I know that people who keep snakes do it. I just don't know how. I think that the GTF's need hibernation and then will breed in the spring. How do you lower the temp, and how low would it need to be, etc. I just think it will be fun to try.
Anonymous


# Posted: 31 Dec 2005 00:26



Posted: Dec 29, 2005 01:16:00
Quote

I am thinking of catching some green tree frogs this spring/summer when they come out.


If you have them native to your area, then just mimick the out door temps and humidity, etc. The answer to your question is just out your window.

bonsai
Member
1925 posts
1925 posts

# Posted: 31 Dec 2005 00:28 · Edited by: bonsai


Sorry that smart-ass post just above was mine.

Here's some links with a little data.
http://www.inhs.uiuc.edu/chf/pub/surveyreports/mar-apr95/specspot.html
http://www.enature.com/fieldguides/detail.asp?recnum=AR0015
http://www.herpsofnc.org/herps_of_NC/anurans/Hyl_cin.html
http://www.dcnr.state.al.us/watchable-wildlife/what/Amphibians/Frogs/
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/natsci/herpetology/FOMA/hcinerea.htm
http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/narcam/idguide/hcinerea.htm


*snarky remarky at your service*...http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=snarky
back2eight
Member
1554 posts
1554 posts

# Posted: 31 Dec 2005 18:15


Ok, I looked at all of those links and they all talk about their natural habitat. I am very familiar with their natual habitat as I have lived in it all of my life. All my life in the summer in the evening you can find dozens of them clinging to the windows catching insects. It is part of a Mississippi evening, to hear the calls of the frogs and have to fight the mosquitoes! My question was and still is, how do you put an animal into hibernation? If you are keeping it inside where your room temperature does not fluctuate, what methods are used to cool the terrarium so that hibernation can occur? That's part A of the question. Part B is if anyone has kept these captive and tried to breed them, is reproduction successful WITHOUT hibernation, or is it a neccessary thing for them? I am very familiar with thier natural habitat, but am curious as to how they are kept and dealt with in captivity.

bonsai
Member
1925 posts
1925 posts

# Posted: 3 Jan 2006 04:22 · Edited by: bonsai


I came up with a little more info from googling "captive breeding Hyla cinerea"

Lost the various links before I could post them, however, here is the link to start your research into the questions you have.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=captive+breeding+Hyla+cinerea &btnG=Google+Search


The long and short of your query: Drop the temperature down to close to what your winter time temperatures are for about 60 days (keep above freezing....I would think that 45 degrees F would be enough). Then bring the temps up. You would want to do both the lowering and rising of temps in stages, not suddenly. At the same time you drop the temps you would have a dryer environment as well as cutting back on daylight (lamps on a timer for example). When you start increasing the temperatures, you also increase humidity and longer daylight hours.
A rain chamber may also be of help as well.

Keep in mind you need to have healthy and sexually mature frogs. Also brumation can be hard on frogs, in which case they can die a botched job.

If you look hard enough, you will find some detail in the links....not much though.

How much experience do you have with frogs?

It just may be possible that you could just cycle the frogs through a dry and wet cycle with a rain chamber or just a rain chamber if you capture the frogs in the late winter/ early spring as they come out. Of course if you wait longer, you can collect the eggs and/or tads and start there. Good experience as well as knowing the age of the frogs from the start.

I have a green tree frog, however, I haven't tried breeding them. I have raised temperate and tropical frogs from eggs, just haven't breed any frogs to date, thus what I state above is more "common sense" than fact.

Here in New England we have basements, hatches to the basement (the covered stairway from outside to inside) and in my case I have an enclosed unheated porch, thus I can set up micro climates from freezing to about 60 degrees F with no problems.

I your case, I would guess you have no basement, however if you have a porch (unheated) then you could create an encloseure that you could control.

Even a window, opened and a wooden box enclosure stuck into it much like a window air conditioner could be done.

It is a matter of thinking about the frogs environment, researching your local weather conditions....i.e. the highs and lows...average means of winter, summer, spring and fall, daylight hours for the seasons, humidity averages for the seasons and duplicating them.

If cooling is an issue for you another thing you may be able to do is use a small or get an old refrigerater. May sound crazy, but I know people who has done this for temperate bonsai....and I have plenty of experience with using the spaces I mentioned above for wintering all kinds of species of bonsai from the tropics to, to 14000 feet, to near the artic circle. Many of the trees need to go dormant, much like many specie of frogs need to brumate to stay healthy.

Good luck wilth your quest.


*snarky remarky at your service*...http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=snarky
back2eight
Member
1554 posts
1554 posts

# Posted: 3 Jan 2006 15:57


Thanks for all the info? No, I don't have a basement or an enclosed porch. Cooling it down to that temp and keeping it that way would probably be more trouble than it is worth. Even if I just sat the tank outside it wouldn't be guaranteed, because it can drop below freezing and then the next week be hot again. We have strange weather! It was in the 20s last week and this week we have been running the air conditioner and wearing shorts! All the animals are coming out of hibernation in the wild due to this warm weather. It is strange to see snakes moving again and it just January!

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