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talk to the frog / Feeding / What you guys think?
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LDCRLUIS
Member
14 posts
14 posts

# Posted: 12 Sep 2012 05:07


So I got a leptodactylus savagei

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leptodactylus_savage i I made the wiki my self!! :lol

for about 2 years and you people will not believe what I have fed him:
crickets, mice, toads, lizards, geckos, green iguana (a baby of course), live chick, gizzards, jam, SAUSAGES and so on.

so my question is, what do you think will happen if I feed him with CHEESE.
I know it sounds kind of crazy but this frog has a very strong stomach.

Tell me your thoughts.

Sandy_Bear
Member
1842 posts
1842 posts

# Posted: 12 Sep 2012 15:17


You are feeding your frog some pretty inappropriate food items. Amphibians are supposed to be eating bugs, not cheese, jam, and sausages. Just because your frog will eat them, doesn't mean that he should be eating them, you will end up giving him a dietary disorder from doing that.

I suggest you look into getting some more appropriate food items for your frog:

Earth worms: African Nightcrawlers, European Nightcrawlers, and Red Wrigglers
Cockroaches: Dubia, Discoid, Red Runners, Madagascar Hissers, Lobster, Orange Heads, Six Spotted and Green Banana Roaches
Crickets, and Locusts
Silkworms, Hornworms, Waxworms, and Butterworms

Rodents should only be offered twice a year maximum, and I believe the same goes for poultry.
Amphibians do not digest the fats in mammals properly and it gets stored in their bodies. Feeding him items like sausages and cheese, both of which are high in animal fats is not appropriate.

LDCRLUIS
Member
14 posts
14 posts

# Posted: 12 Sep 2012 19:47


I suggest you look into getting some more appropriate food items for your frog:

Earth worms: African Nightcrawlers, European Nightcrawlers, and Red Wrigglers
Cockroaches: Dubia, Discoid, Red Runners, Madagascar Hissers, Lobster, Orange Heads, Six Spotted and Green Banana Roaches
Crickets, and Locusts
Silkworms, Hornworms, Waxworms, and Butterworms


Thanks for your answer Sandy_Bear.
I would wish to be able to feed my frog with all of that healthy food you are saying however the thing is that here where I live one cannot buy any off that stuff.
Off course I try hard to catch insects outside but it is hard to find plenty.

I would be really grateful if you give me ideas of foods that I can get judging the absence of a proper pet store

BIG HYDRO
Member
3666 posts
3666 posts

# Posted: 12 Sep 2012 19:52


Where do you live?



Imperfection is beauty, madness is genius, and its better to be absolutely ridiculous than absolutely boring.
LDCRLUIS
Member
14 posts
14 posts

# Posted: 12 Sep 2012 20:51 · Edited by: LDCRLUIS


Where do you live?

Costa Rica
But in a town, is not like all the country is like that.

Sandy_Bear
Member
1842 posts
1842 posts

# Posted: 12 Sep 2012 21:10 · Edited by: Sandy_Bear


You should be able to find Dubia Roaches in your area:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blaptica_dubia

Other Roaches native to Costa Rica:

Zebra roach Eurycotis decipiens

Giant cave roach Blaberus giganteus
URL

Are there any stick bugs in your area? These can be easily cultured at home too

LDCRLUIS
Member
14 posts
14 posts

# Posted: 12 Sep 2012 23:03 · Edited by: LDCRLUIS


Sadly there is no stick bugs nearby.

Those cockroaches you say like the zebra roach and giant cave roach are found only in deep forest, but I will try hard finding dubias.

But what do you think about common cockroaches?

Sandy_Bear
Member
1842 posts
1842 posts

# Posted: 12 Sep 2012 23:16


what species is your common cockroach? Do you have pictures of it?

They should be just fine to use, provided you culture them at home, that way you can avoid any poisons or other nasties that the roach could have possibly ingested or come into contact with.

Many species of roaches are able to climb smooth surfaces like glass or plastics. Lots of people like to culture roaches in Rubbermaid tubs. To help keep the roaches from escaping, you can put a 3-inch wide band of Vaseline around the top portion of the tub.

Dubias are really great beginner species of roaches, they do not climb glass nor do they fly, they also do not run very fast, they don't cannibalize their young, they don't bite, and they produce around 30 babies every month. They are quite a popular favourite in the hobby.

LDCRLUIS
Member
14 posts
14 posts

# Posted: 13 Sep 2012 16:59


I meant the Periplaneta americana

But I was yesterday thinking that here were I live there is plenty of crickets,

I tried catching them with a bottle trap but did not worked.
Any other ideas?

Joh
Member
83 posts
83 posts

# Posted: 13 Sep 2012 18:28


If you are referring to crickets that live in plants, you should be able to catch them quite easily with a sweep net(by following their sounds). Although, you probably can't buy a sweep net in a small town(we don't get any either) you can make your own quite easily.
This link is to a pdf that shows you how.URL

If you are referring to ground-dwelling crickets, you should be able to start a culture if you can catch several(avoid keeping more than one male as they sometimes fight). You should be able to catch them, by turning over rocks and logs, and looking underneath.
Once you find one, you can net it if it jumps. Or, slowly place a container over it, and then put the lid back on.

Hope this helps.

Sandy_Bear
Member
1842 posts
1842 posts

# Posted: 13 Sep 2012 20:40


Yes, those roaches should be very easy to culture. I suggest being generous with the Vaseline

Here's a link to them:

Periplaneta americana

If you are going to culture these, I suggest collecting several males and females. Once they lay their egg sacs (oothicas) remove those from the enclosure and place them in the tub you plan on culturing them in.
The parent bugs might be dirty, and this will help keep your pet healthy.

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